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Clinical Services:

HIV TESTING

What is HIV?

  • HIV stands for Human Immunodeficiency Virus
  • HIV is the virus that causes AIDS
  • HIV may be passed from one person to another when infected blood, semen, or vaginal secretions come in contact with an uninfected person’s broken skin or mucous membranes. These can include the mouth, eyes, nose, vagina, rectum and opening of the penis.
  • Infected pregnant women can pass HIV to their baby during pregnancy or delivery, as well as through breast-feeding.
  • People with HIV have what is called HIV infection. Some of these people will develop AIDS as a result of their HIV infection.

How is HIV Transmitted?

HIV is spread by sexual contact with an infected person, by sharing needles and/or syringes (primarily for drug injection) with someone who is infected, or, less commonly (and now very rarely in countries where blood is screened for HIV Antibodies), through transfusions of infected blood or blood clotting factors. Babies born to HIV-infected women may become infected before or during birth or through breast-feeding after birth.

What is AIDS?

  • AIDS stands for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.
  • The word Acquired means the disease is not hereditary but develops after birth from contact with a disease causing agent (in this case, HIV).
  • The word Immunodeficiency means that the disease is characterized by a weakening of the immune system.
  • The word Syndrome refers to a group of symptoms that collectively indicate or characterize a disease.
  • In the case of AIDS this can include the development of certain infections and/or cancers, as well as a decrease in the number of certain cells in a person’s immune system.
  • An official AIDS diagnosis is done by a physician using specific clinical or laboratory standards.

What causes AIDS?

AIDS is caused by infection with a virus called human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This virus is passed from one person to another through blood-to-blood and sexual contact. In addition, pregnant women can pass HIV to their babies during pregnancy or delivery, as well as through breast feeding. People with HIV have what is called HIV infection.

HIV SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS

Often people who are HIV infected have few or no symptoms. Other times, symptoms of HIV are confused with other illnesses such as the flu. If a person were to have symptoms they would include:

  • Swollen lymph nodes in the neck, groin or under the arms
  • Diarrhea
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Fatigue
  • Fever, chills or sweats (especially at night)
  • Visual changes
  • Frequent pneumonias or shortness of breath
  • Rash
  • Flu-like symptoms

SYPHILIS TESTING

What is Syphilis?

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. It has often been called “the great imitator” because so many of the signs and symptoms are indistinguishable from those of other diseases.

How Common is Syphilis?

  • Over 36,000 cases of syphilis in 2006, including 9,756 cases of primary and secondary (P&S) syphilis.
  • In 2006, half of all P&S syphilis cases were reported from 20 counties and 2 cities; and most P&S syphilis cases occurred in persons 20 to 39 years of age.
  • P&S syphilis was highest in women 20 to 24 years of age and in men 35 to 39 years of age.
  • Reported cases of congenital syphilis in newborns increased from 2005 to 2006, with 339 new cases reported in 2005 compared to 349 cases in 2006.
  • Between 2005 and 2006, the number of reported P&S syphilis cases increased 11.8 percent.
  • P&S rates have increased in males each year between 2000 and 2006 from 2.6 to 5.7 and among females between 2004 and 2006.
  • In 2006, 64% of the reported P&S syphilis cases were among men who have sex with men (MSM).

How do People get Syphilis?

  • Direct contact with a syphilis sore- mainly on the external genitals, vagina,anus, or in the rectum. Sores also can occur on the lips and in the mouth.
  • Transmission of the organism occurs during vaginal, anal, or oral sex.
  • Pregnant women with the disease can pass it to the babies they are carrying.
  • Syphilis cannot be spread through contact with toilet seats, doorknobs,swimming pools, hot tubs, bathtubs, shared clothing, or eating utensils.

What are the Signs and Symptoms in Adults?

Many people infected with syphilis do not have any symptoms for years, yet remain at risk for late complications if they are not treated. Although transmission appears to occur from persons with sores who are in the primary or secondary stage, many of these sores are unrecognized. Thus, transmission may occur from persons who are unaware of their infection.

Syphilis: Primary Stage

  • The appearance of a single sore (called a chancre), but there may be multiple sores. The time between infection with syphilis and the start of the first symptom can range from 10 to 90 days (average 21 days).
  • The chancre is usually firm, round, small, and painless and appears at the spot where syphilis entered the body.
  • The chancre lasts 3 to 6 weeks, and it heals without treatment. However, if adequate treatment is not administered, the infection progresses to the secondary stage.

Syphilis: Secondary Stage

  • Skin rash and mucous membrane lesions characterize the secondary stage. This stage typically starts with the development of a rash on one or more areas of the body. The rash usually does not cause itching. Rashes associated with secondary syphilis can appear as the chancre is healing or several weeks after the chancre has healed.
  • The characteristic rash of secondary syphilis may appear as rough, red, or reddish brown spots both on the palms of the hands and the bottoms of the feet. However, rashes with a different appearance may occur on other parts of the body, sometimes resembling rashes caused by other diseases.
  • Sometimes rashes associated with secondary syphilis are so faint that they are not noticed.
  • Individuals may experiance fever, swollen lymph glands, sore throat, patchy hair loss, headaches, weight loss, muscle aches, and fatigue.
  • The signs and symptoms of secondary syphilis will resolve with or without treatment, but without treatment, the infection will progress to the latent and possibly late stages of disease.

Syphilis: Late and Latent Stages

  • The latent (hidden) stage of syphilis begins when primary and secondary symptoms disappear.
  • The infected person will continue to have syphilis even though there are no signs or symptoms; the infection remains in the body. This latent stage can last for years.
  • The late stages of syphilis can develop in about 15% of people who have not been treated for syphilis, and can appear 10 – 20 years after infection was first acquired.
  • The disease may subsequently damage the internal organs, including the brain, nerves, eyes, heart, blood vessels, liver, bones, and joints.
  • Signs and symptoms of the late stage of syphilis include difficulty coordinating muscle movements, paralysis, numbness, gradual blindness, and dementia.
  • As the disease process progresses, death may occur as a result of latent syphilis infection.

How does syphilis affect a pregnant person and their baby?

The syphilis bacterium can infect a baby during pregnancy. Depending on how long a pregnant person has been infected, they may have a high risk of having a stillbirth (a baby born dead) or of giving birth to a baby who dies shortly after birth. An infected baby may be born without signs or symptoms of disease. However, if not treated immediately, the baby may develop serious problems within a few weeks. Untreated babies may become developmentally delayed, have seizures, or die.

How is syphilis diagnosed?

Some health care providers can diagnose syphilis by examining material from a chancre (infectious sore) using a special microscope called a dark-field microscope. If syphilis bacteria are present in the sore, they will show up when observed through the microscope. A blood test is another way to determine whether someone has syphilis. Shortly after infection occurs, the body produces syphilis antibodies that can be detected by an accurate, safe, and inexpensive blood test. A low level of antibodies will stay in the blood for months or years even after the disease has been successfully treated. Because untreated syphilis in a pregnant woman can infect and possibly kill her developing baby, every pregnant woman should have a blood test for syphilis.

What is the link between syphilis and HIV?

Genital sores (chancres) caused by syphilis make it easier to transmit and acquire HIV infection sexually. There is an estimated 2- to 5-fold increased risk of acquiring HIV if exposed to that infection when syphilis is present. Ulcerative STDs that cause sores, ulcers, or breaks in the skin or mucous membranes, such as syphilis, disrupt barriers that provide protection against infections. The genital ulcers caused by syphilis can bleed easily, and when they come into contact with oral and rectal mucosa during sex, increase the infectiousness of and susceptibility to HIV. Having other STDs is also an important predictor for becoming HIV infected because STDs are a marker for behaviors associated with HIV transmission.

What is the treatment for syphilis?

Syphilis is easy to cure in its early stages. A single intramuscular injection of penicillin, an antibiotic, will cure a person who has had syphilis for less than a year.
  • Additional doses are needed to treat someone who has had syphilis for longer than a year.
  • For people who are allergic to penicillin, other antibiotics are available to treat syphilis.
  • There are no home remedies or over-the-counter drugs that will cure syphilis. Treatment will kill the syphilis bacterium and prevent further damage, but it will not repair damage already done.
Because effective treatment is available, it is important that persons be screened for syphilis on an on-going basis if their sexual behaviors put them at risk for STDs. Persons who receive syphilis treatment must abstain from sexual contact with new partners until the syphilis sores are completely healed. Persons with syphilis must notify their sex partners so that they also can be tested and receive treatment if necessary.

Will syphilis recur?

Having syphilis once does not protect a person from getting it again. Following successful treatment, people can still be susceptible to re-infection. Only laboratory tests can confirm whether someone has syphilis. Because syphilis sores can be hidden in the vagina, rectum, or mouth, it may not be obvious that a sex partner has syphilis. Talking with a health care provider will help to determine the need to be re-tested for syphilis after being treated.

How can syphilis be prevented?

The surest way to avoid transmission of sexually transmitted diseases, including syphilis, is to abstain from sexual contact or to be in a long-term mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who has been tested and is known to be uninfected. Avoiding alcohol and drug use may also help prevent transmission of syphilis because these activities may lead to risky sexual behavior. It is important that sex partner(s) talk to each other about their HIV status and history of other STDs so that preventive action can be taken. Genital ulcer diseases, like syphilis, can occur in both male and female genital areas that are covered or protected by a latex condom, as well as in areas that are not covered. Correct and consistent use of latex condoms can reduce the risk of syphilis, as well as genital herpes and chancroid, only when the infected area or site of potential exposure is protected. Condoms lubricated with spermicides (especially Nonoxynol-9 or N-9) are no more effective than other lubricated condoms in protecting against the transmission of STDs. Use of condoms lubricated with N-9 is not recommended for STD/HIV prevention. Transmission of an STD, including syphilis cannot be prevented by washing the genitals, urinating, and/or douching after sex. Any unusual discharge, sore, or rash, particularly in the groin area, should be a signal to refrain from having sex and to see a doctor immediately.

HEPATITIS C TESTING

What is Hepatitis C?

Hepatitis C is a serious liver disease that results from infection with the Hepatitis C virus. Hepatitis C has been called a silent epidemic because most people with Hepatitis C do not know they are infected. While some people who get infected with Hepatitis C are able to clear, or get rid of, the virus, most people who get infected develop a chronic, or lifelong, infection. Over time, chronic Hepatitis C can lead to serious liver problems including liver damage, cirrhosis, liver failure, or liver cancer. But many people can benefit from available treatment options that can eliminate the virus from the body and prevent further liver damage. Hepatitis C and Baby Boomers (Born 1945-1965):
  • In 2012, CDC started recommending Hepatitis C testing for everyone born from 1945 – 1965. While anyone can get Hepatitis C, up to 75% of adults infected with Hepatitis C were born from 1945 - 1965

Why should people born during 1945-1965 get tested for Hepatitis C?

Most people with Hepatitis C don’t know they are infected so getting tested is the only way to know.
  • Baby boomers are five times more likely to have Hepatitis C than other adults.
  • The longer people live with Hepatitis C undiagnosed and untreated, the more likely they are to develop serious, life-threatening liver disease.
  • Liver disease, liver cancer, and deaths from Hepatitis C are on the rise.
  • Getting tested can help people learn if they are infected and get them into lifesaving care and treatment.
  • Getting tested can help people learn if they are infected and get them into lifesaving care and treatment.
The reason that baby boomers have high rates of Hepatitis C is not completely understood. Most boomers are believed to have become infected in the 1970s and 1980s when rates of Hepatitis C were the highest.

How do you get Hepatitis C?

Hepatitis C is usually spread when blood from a person infected with the Hepatitis C virus enters the body of someone who is not infected. This can happen through multiple ways. Before widespread screening of the blood supply began in 1992, Hepatitis C was spread through blood transfusions and organ transplants. People with clotting problems who took blood products prior to 1987 could have been exposed to Hepatitis C. Sharing needles or other equipment to inject drugs was and is a very efficient way to transmit the virus. People have also become infected with the Hepatitis C virus from body piercing or tattoos that were done in prisons, homes, or in other unlicensed or informal facilities. Although uncommon, outbreaks of Hepatitis C have occurred from poor infection control in health care settings. In rare cases, Hepatitis C may be sexually transmitted. Babies born to mothers with Hepatitis C can get infected during childbirth. Still, many people do not know how or when they were infected. Hepatitis C is not spread by casual contact, kissing, hugging, sneezing, coughing, breastfeeding or sharing food, eating utensils or glasses.

Symptoms

Many people with chronic Hepatitis C do not have symptoms and do not know they are infected. People with chronic Hepatitis C can live for decades without symptoms or feeling sick. When symptoms do appear, they often are a sign of advanced liver disease. Symptoms of Hepatitis C can include: fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark urine, grey-colored stools, joint pain and/or jaundice.

Information on Testing

The only way to know if someone has Hepatitis C is to get tested. Doctors use a blood test, called a Hepatitis C Antibody Test, to find out if a person has ever been infected with Hepatitis C. The Hepatitis C Antibody Test looks for antibodies to the Hepatitis C virus. Antibodies are chemicals released into the bloodstream when someone gets infected. The antibody test results will take anywhere from a few days to a few weeks to come back, although new Rapid Antibody Tests are available in some settings. A Non-reactive or a negative Hepatitis C antibody test result means that a person does not have Hepatitis C. However, if a person has been recently exposed to the Hepatitis C virus, he or she will need to be tested again. A Reactive or a positive Hepatitis C antibody test result means that Hepatitis C antibodies were found in the blood and a person has been infected with the Hepatitis C virus at some point in time. A reactive antibody test does not necessarily mean a person still has Hepatitis C. Once people have been infected, they will always have antibodies in their blood. This is true if even if they have cleared the Hepatitis C virus. A reactive antibody test requires an additional, follow-up test to determine if a person is currently infected with Hepatitis C.

How is chronic Hepatitis C treated?

Medications, called antivirals, can be used to treat many people with chronic Hepatitis C. There are several medications available to treat chronic Hepatitis C, including new treatments that appear to be more effective and have fewer side effects than previous options. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) maintains a complete list of approved treatments for Hepatitis C. However, not everyone can benefit from treatment. It is important to be checked by a doctor experienced in treating chronic Hepatitis C. They can determine the most appropriate medical care. Decisions about starting treatment are based on many factors, such as the type of virus, the condition of the liver, and other health conditions. Whether or not to be treated or when to start treatment should be discussed with your doctor.

To protect your liver, you can:

  • Ask your doctor before taking any prescription, over-the-counter medications, supplements or vitamins. For instance, some drugs, such as certain pain medications, can potentially damage the liver.
  • Avoid alcohol since it can increase the speed of liver damage.
  • Talk to your doctor about getting vaccinated against Hepatitis A and B.

GONORRHEA TESTING

What is gonorrhea?

  • Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted disease (STD), caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae.
  • Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a bacterium that can grow and multiply easily in the warm, moist areas of the reproductive tract, including the cervix, uterus, and fallopian tubes, and in the urethra.
  • This bacterium can also grow in the mouth, throat, eyes, and anus.

How common is gonorrhea?

Gonorrhea is a very common infectious disease.
  • CDC estimates that more than 700,000 persons in the U.S. get new gonorrheal infections each year, although only about half of these infections are reported.
  • In 2006, 358,366 cases of gonorrhea were reported to CDC.

How do people get gonorrhea?

Any sexually active person can be infected with gonorrhea. In the United States, the highest reported rates of infection are among sexually active teenagers, young adults, and African Americans.
  • Gonorrhea is spread through contact with the penis, vagina, mouth, or anus.
  • Ejaculation does not have to occur for gonorrhea to be transmitted or acquired.
  • Can also be spread from mother to baby during delivery.
  • People who have had gonorrhea and received treatment may get infected again if they have sexual contact with a person infected with gonorrhea.

What are the signs and symptoms of gonorrhea?

Gonorrhea may have no symptoms at all. But some symptoms and signs include:
  • A burning sensation when urinating.
  • Painful or swollen testicles.
  • White, yellow, or green discharge from the penis.
  • Increased vaginal discharge.
  • Vaginal bleeding between periods.
  • Anal discharge itching, soreness, bleeding, or painful bowel movements.
  • Infections in the throat may cause a sore throat but usually causes no symptoms.

What are the complications of gonorrhea?

Untreated gonorrhea can cause serious and permanent health problems.
  • Gonorrhea is a common cause of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). About one million people with a vagina and uturus each year in the United States develop PID. The symptoms may be quite mild or can be very severe and can include abdominal pain and fever. PID can lead to internal abscesses (pus-filled “pockets” that are hard to cure) and long-lasting, chronic pelvic pain. PID can damage the fallopian tubes enough to cause infertility or increase the risk of ectopic pregnancy. Ectopic pregnancy is a life-threatening condition in which a fertilized egg grows outside the uterus, usually in a fallopian tube
  • Gonorrhea can cause epididymitis, a painful condition of the ducts attached to the testicles that may lead to infertility if left untreated.
  • Gonorrhea can spread to the blood or joints. This condition can be life threatening.
  • People with gonorrhea can more easily contract HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.
  • HIV-infected people with gonorrhea can transmit HIV more easily to someone else than if they did not have gonorrhea..

How does gonorrhea affect a pregnant people and babies?

If a pregnant person has gonorrhea, they may give the infection to their baby as the baby passes through the birth canal during delivery. This can cause blindness, joint infection, or a life-threatening blood infection in the baby. Treatment of gonorrhea as soon as it is detected in pregnant people will reduce the risk of these complications. Pregnant people should consult a health care provider for appropriate examination, testing, and treatment, as necessary.

How is gonorrhea diagnosed?

Several laboratory tests are available to diagnose gonorrhea. A doctor or nurse can obtain a sample for testing from the parts of the body likely to be infected (cervix, urethra, rectum, or throat) and send the sample to a laboratory for analysis. Gonorrhea that is present in the cervix or urethra can be diagnosed in a laboratory by testing a urine sample. A quick laboratory test for gonorrhea that can be done in some clinics or doctor’s offices is a Gram stain. A Gram stain of a sample from a urethra or a cervix allows the doctor to see the gonorrhea bacterium under a microscope.

What is the treatment for gonorrhea?

Several antibiotics can successfully cure gonorrhea in adolescents and adults. However, drug-resistant strains of gonorrhea are increasing in many areas of the world,including the United States, and successful treatment of gonorrhea is becoming more difficult. Because many people with gonorrhea also have chlamydia, another STD, antibiotics for both infections are usually given together.
  • Persons with gonorrhea should be tested for other STDs.
  • It is important to take all of the medication prescribed to cure gonorrhea. Although medication will stop the infection, it will not repair any permanent damage done by the disease.
  • People who have had gonorrhea and have been treated can get the disease again if they have sexual contact with persons infected with gonorrhea. If a person’s symptoms continue even after receiving treatment, he or she should return to a doctor to be reevaluated.

How can gonorrhea be prevented?

Any genital symptoms such as discharge or burning during urination or unusual sore or rash should be a signal to stop having sex and to see a doctor immediately. If a person has been diagnosed and treated for gonorrhea, he or she should notify all recent sex partner(s) so they can see a health care provider and be treated. This will reduce the risk that the sex partner(s) will develop serious complications from gonorrhea and will also reduce the person’s risk of becoming re-infected. The person and all of his or her sex partner(s) must avoid sex until they have completed their treatment for gonorrhea.
  • The surest way to avoid transmission of STDs is to abstain from sexual intercourse, or to be in a long-term mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who has been tested and is known to be uninfected.
  • Latex condoms, when used consistently and correctly, can reduce the risk of transmission of gonorrhea.

CHLAMYDIA TESTING

What is Chlamydia?

Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by the bacterium, Chlamydia Trachomatis and serious complications from Chlamydia can cause irreversible damage, including infertility. Chlamydia is known as a “silent” disease because about three quarters of infected women and about half of infected men have no symptoms. If symptoms do occur, they usually appear within 1 to 3 weeks after exposure. Chlamydia also can cause discharge from the penis and can damage female reproductive organs.

Bodies with female reproductive organs who have symptoms might experiance:

  • An abnormal vaginal discharge or a burning sensation when urinating.
  • Lower abdominal pain.
  • Lower back pain.
  • Nausea.
  • Fever.
  • Pain during intercourse.
  • Bleeding between menstrual periods.

Bodies with male reproductive organs who have symptoms might experiance:

  • A discharge from their penis.
  • Burning sensation when urinating.
  • Burning and itching around the opening of the penis.
  • Pain and swelling in the testicles are uncommon.

How common is Chlamydia?

Chlamydia is the most frequently reported bacterial sexually transmitted disease in the United States In 2006, 1,030,911 chlamydial infections were reported to CDC from 50 states and the District of Columbia. Under-reporting is substantial because most people with chlamydia are not aware of their infections and do not seek testing.

How do people get Chlamydia?

Any sexually active person can be infected with chlamydia. The greater the number of sex partner(s), the greater the risk of infection. Because the cervix (opening to the uterus) of teenage girls and young women is not fully matured, they are at particularly high risk for infection if sexually active. Since chlamydia can be transmitted by oral or anal sex, men who have sex with men are also at risk for chlamydial infection.Men or women who have receptive anal intercourse may acquire chlamydial infection in the rectum,which can cause rectal pain,discharge,or bleeding. Chlamydia can also be found in the throats of women and men having oral sex with an infected partner.
  • Chlamydia can be transmitted during vaginal, anal, or oral sex.
  • Passed from mother to baby during vaginal childbirth.

What complications can result from untreated chlamydia?

Bodies with female reproductive organs:

  • Can spread into the uterus or fallopian tubes and cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). This happens in up to 40 percent of female reproductive organs with untreated chlamydia.
  • PID can cause permanent damage to the fallopian tubes, uterus, and surrounding tissues. The damage can lead to chronic pelvic pain, infertility, and potentially fatal ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy outside the uterus).
  • Female reproductive organs infected with chlamydia are up to five times more likely to become infected with HIV, if exposed.

Bodies with male reproductive organs:

  • Infection sometimes spreads to the epididymis (the tube that carries sperm from the testis), causing pain, fever, and, rarely, sterility.

To help prevent the serious consequences of chlamydia, screening at least annually for chlamydia is recommended for all who are sexually active. An annual screening test also is recommended for those with risk factors for chlamydia (a new sex partner or multiple sex partners). All pregnant people should have a screening test for chlamydia

How does Chlamydia affect a pregnant body and the baby?

For pregnant people, there is some evidence that untreated chlamydial infections can lead to premature delivery. Babies can get chlamydial infections in their eyes and respiratory tracts during birth. Chlamydia is a leading cause of early infant pneumonia and conjunctivitis (pink eye) in newborns.

How is Chlamydia diagnosed?

There are laboratory tests to diagnose chlamydia. Some can be performed on urine, other tests require that a specimen be collected from a site such as the penis or cervix.

What is the treatment for Chlamydia?

Women whose sex partner(s) have not been appropriately treated are at high risk for re-infection. Having multiple infections increases a woman’s risk of serious reproductive health complications, including infertility. Retesting should be considered for women, especially adolescents, three to four months after treatment. This is especially true if a woman does not know if her sex partner received treatment.
  • Chlamydia can be easily treated and cured with antibiotics.
  • A single dose of azithromycin or a week of doxycycline (twice daily) are the most commonly used treatments.
  • HIV-positive persons with chlamydia should receive the same treatment as those who are HIV negative.
  • All sex partner(s) should be evaluated, tested, and treated. Persons with Chlamydia should abstain from sexual intercourse until they and their sex partner(s) have completed treatment, otherwise re-infection is possible.

How can Chlamydia be prevented?

Any genital symptoms such as an unusual sore, discharge with odor, burning during urination, or bleeding between menstrual cycles could mean an STD infection. If a woman has any of these symptoms, she should stop having sex and consult a health care provider immediately. Treating STDs early can prevent PID. Women who are told they have an STD and are treated for it should notify all of their recent sex partners (sex partners within the preceding 60 days) so they can see a health care provider and be evaluated for STDs. Sexual activity should not resume until all sex partners have been examined and, if necessary, treated.
  • The surest way to avoid transmission of STDs is to abstain from sexual contact, or to be in a long-term mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who has been tested and is known to be uninfected.
  • Latex male condoms, when used consistently and correctly, can reduce the risk of transmission of Chlamydia.
  • CDC recommends yearly chlamydia testing of all sexually active women age 25 or younger, older women with risk factors for chlamydial infections (those who have a new sex partner or multiple sex partners), and all pregnant women.
  • An appropriate sexual risk assessment by a health care provider should always be conducted and may indicate more frequent screening for some women.

BLOOD PRESSURE SCREENING
High blood pressure is a common and dangerous condition. Having high blood pressure means the pressure of the blood in your blood vessels is higher than it should be. But you can take steps to control your blood pressure and lower your risk. About 1 in 3 U.S. adults—or 67 million people—have high blood pressure.1 Only about half (47%) of people with high blood pressure have their condition under control.1 This common condition increases the risk for heart disease and stroke, two leading causes of death for Americans.2 Get more quick facts about high blood pressure, or learn more about high blood pressure in the United States. High blood pressure is called the “silent killer” because it often has no warning signs or symptoms, and many people don’t know they have it. That’s why it’s important to check your blood pressure regularly. The good news is that you can take steps to prevent high blood pressure or to control it if your blood pressure is already high.

GLUCOSE SCREENING
It’s important to your health to control your blood glucose (also called blood sugar). Keeping your glucose level close to normal helps prevent or delay some diabetes problems, such as eye disease, kidney disease, and nerve damage. One thing that can help you control your glucose level is to keep track of it. You can do this by
  • Testing your own glucose a number of times each day (self-monitoring blood glucose).
  • Many people with diabetes test their glucose 2 to 4 times a day.
  • Getting an A1C test from your health care provider about every 3 months.
You’ll learn more about these tests on the next pages. These tests can help you and the rest of your diabetes health care team—doctor, diabetes educator, and others—work together to help you control your blood glucose.

Immunizations:

Immunizations will be provided to those who qualify.
  • Hepatitis A.
  • Hepatitis B.
  • HPV.
  • Flu Vaccine.
  • Tdap.
  • Meningitis.

Family Resources:

Womens, Infants & Children

WIC (If you need any info go to: http://www.houstontx.gov/health/WIC/index.html) WIC is a free nutrition program that helps pregnant women, new mothers, and young children eat well, learn about nutrition and stay healthy. Nutrition education and counseling, nutritious foods and help accessing health care are provided to middle to low-income women, infants, and children through the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program, popularly known as WIC. U.S. citizenship is not required.

Who can apply?

  • Pregnant women.
  • Women who are breastfeeding a baby under 1 year.
  • Women who have had a baby in the past six months.
  • Parents, guardians, and foster parents of children under 5 years.
  • Those employed/ insured can also apply.

Who can apply?

Family planning is the voluntary planning and action taken by individuals to prevent, delay or achieve a pregnancy. Family planning services include counseling and education, preconception care, screening and laboratory tests, and all FDA approved methods of contraception.

Wellness Services:

Wellness

  • Healthy Eating & Diet.
  • Fitness Classes.
  • Hands-only CPR.

Blood Pressure

High blood pressure is a common and dangerous condition. Having high blood pressure means the pressure of the blood in your blood vessels is higher than it should be. But you can take steps to control your blood pressure and lower your risk. About 1 in 3 U.S. adults - or 67 million people - have high blood pressure.1 Only about half (47%) of people with high blood pressure have their condition under control. This common condition increases the risk for heart disease and stroke, two leading causes of death for Americans.2 Get more quick facts about high blood pressure, or learn more about high blood pressure in the United States. High blood pressure is called the "silent killer" because it often has no warning signs or symptoms, and many people don't know they have it. That's why it's important to check your blood pressure regularly. The good news is that you can take steps to prevent high blood pressure or to control it if your blood pressure is already high.

Glucose

It's important to your health to control your blood glucose (also called blood sugar). Keeping your glucose level close to normal helps prevent or delay some diabetes problems, such as eye disease, kidney disease, and nerve damage. One thing that can help you control your glucose level is to keep track of it. You can do this by
  • Testing your own glucose a number of times each day (self-monitoring blood glucose)..
  • Many people with diabetes test their glucose 2 to 4 times a day.
  • Getting an A1C test from your health care provider about every 3 months.
 

 

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